Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Final Beta testing for Utopic

Can you believe final beta is here for utopic already? Where has the summer gone? The milestone and images are already prepared for the final beta testing. This is the first round of image testing for ubuntu this cycle. A final image will also be tested next month, but now is the time to try out the image on your system. Be sure to report any bugs you may find. This will help ensure there is time to fix them before the release images.

To help make sure the final utopic image is in good shape, we need your help and test results! Please, head over to the milestone on the isotracker, select your favorite flavor and perform the needed tests against the images.

If you've never submitted test results for the iso tracker, check out the handy links on top of the isotracker page detailing how to perform an image test, as well as a little about how the qatracker itself works. If you still aren't sure or get stuck, feel free to contact the qa community or myself for help. Happy Testing!

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Autopilot Test Runners

In my last next post, I discussed will discuss notable autopilot features and talk about how autopilot has matured since it became an independent project.

In the meantime I would be remiss if I didn't also talk about the different test runners commonly used with autopilot tests. In addition to the autopilot binary which can be executed to run the tests, different tools have cropped up to make running tests easier.

autopilot-sandbox-run
This tool ships with autopilot itself and was developed as a way to run autopilot test suites on your desktop in a sane manner. Run the autopilot3-sandbox-run command with --help to see all the options available. By default, the tests will run in an Xvfb server, all completely behind the scenes with the results being reported to you upon completion. This is a great way to run tests with no interference on your desktop. If you are a visual person like me, you may instead wish to pass -X to enable the test runs to occur in a Xephyr window allowing you to see what's happening, but still retaining control of your mouse and keyboard.

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install python3-autopilot

I want to run tests on my desktop without losing control of my mouse!
autopilot3-sandbox-run my_testsuite_name

I want to run tests on my desktop without losing control of my mouse, but I still want to see what's happening!
autopilot3-sandbox-run -X my_testsuite_name

Autopkgtest
Autopkgtest was developed as a means to automatically test Debian packages, "as-installed". Recently support was added to also test click packages and to run on phablet devices. Autopkgtest will take care of dependencies, setting up autopilot, and unlocking the device. You can literally plug in a device and wait for the results. You should really checkout the README pages, including those on running tests. That said, here's a quick primer on running tests using autopkgtest.

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install autopkgtest
If you are on trusty, grab and install the utopic deb from here.

I want to run tests for a click package installed on my device!
Awesome. This one is simple. Connect the device and then run:
adt-run --click my.click.name --- ssh -s adb

For example,
adt-run --click com.ubuntu.music --- ssh -s adb

will run the tests for the installed version of the music app on your device. You don't need to do anything else. For the curious, this works by reading the manifest file all click packages have. Read more here.

I want to run the tests I wrote/modified against an installed click package!
For this you need to also pass your local folder containing the tests. You will also want to make sure you installed the new version of the click package if needed.

adt-run my-folder/ --click my.click.name --- ssh -s adb

Autopkgtest can also run in a lxc container, QEMU, a chroot, and other fun targets. In the examples above, I passed --- ssh -s adb as the target, instructing autopkgtest to use ssh and adb and thus run the tests on a connected phablet device. If you want to run autopilot tests on a phablet device, I recommend using autopkgtest as it handles everything for you.

phablet-test-run
This tool is part of the greater phablet-tools package. It was originally developed as an easy way to execute tests on your phablet device. Note however that copying the tests and any dependencies to the phablet device is left to you. The phablet-tools package provides some other useful utilities to help you with this (checkout phablet-click-test-setup for example).

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install phablet-tools

I want to run the tests I wrote/modified against an installed click package!
First copy the tests to the device. You can use the ubuntu sdk or click-buddy for this, or even do it manually via adb. Then run phablet-test-run. It takes the same arguments as autopilot itself.

phablet-test-run -v my_testsuite

Note the tools looks for the testsuite and any dependencies of the testsuite inside the /home/phablet/autopilot folder. It's up to you to make sure everything that is needed to run your tests are located there or else it will fail.

other ways
There are of course other possible test runners that wrap around autopilot to make executing tests easier. Perhaps you've written a script yourself. Just remember at the end of the day the autopilot binary will be running the tests. It simply needs to be able to find the testsuite and all of it's dependencies in order to run. For this reason, don't be afraid to execute autopilot3 and run the tests yourself. Happy test runs!

Monday, August 25, 2014

Ubuntu Phone Translations Needed

As we continue to iterate on new ubuntu touch images, it's important for everyone to be able to enjoy the ubuntu phone experience in their native language. This is where you can help!

We need your input and help to make sure the phone images are well localized for your native language. If you've never contributed a translation before, this is a perfect opportunity for you to learn. There's a wiki guide to help you, along with translation teams who speak your language and can help.

Don't worry, you don't need a ubuntu phone to do this work. The wiki guide details how to translate using a phone, emulator, or even just your desktop PC running ubuntu. If nothing else, you can help review other folks translations by simply using launchpad in your web browser.

If this sounds interesting to you and the links don't make sense or you would like some more personal help, feel free to contact me. English is preferred, but in the spirit of translation feel free to contact me in French, Spanish or perhaps even German :-).

Happy Translating everyone!

P.S. If you are curious about the status of your language translation, or looking for known missing strings, have a look at the stats page kept by David Planella.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

A new test runner approaches

The problem
How acceptance tests are packaged and run has morphed over time. When autopilot was originally conceived the largest user was the unity project and debian packaging was the norm. Now that autopilot has moved well beyond that simple view to support many types of applications running across different form factors, it was time to address the issue of how to run and package these high-level tests.

While helping develop testsuites for the core apps targeting ubuntu touch, it became increasingly difficult for developers to run their application's testsuites. This gave rise to further integration points inside qtcreator, enhancements to click and its manifest files, and tools like the phablet-tools suite and click-buddy. All of these tools operate well within the confines they are intended, but none truly meets the needs for test provisioning and execution.

A solution?
With these thoughts in mind I opened the floor for discussion a couple months ago detailing the need for a proper tool that could meet all of my needs, as well as those of the application developer, test author and CI folks. In a nutshell, a workflow to setup a device as well as properly manage dependencies and resolve them was needed.

Autopkg tests all the things
I'm happy to report that as of a couple weeks ago such a tool now exists in autopkgtest. If the name sounds familar, that's because it is. Autopkgtest already runs all of our automated testing at the archive level. New package uploads are tested utilizing its toolset.

So what does this mean? Utilizing the format laid out by autopkgtest, you can now run your autopilot testsuite on a phablet device in a sane manner. If you have test dependencies, they can be defined and added to the click manifest as specified. If you don't have any test dependencies, then you can run your testsuite today without any modifications to the click manifest.

Yes, but what does this really mean?
This means you can now run a testsuite with adt-run in a similar manner to how debian packages are tested. The runner will setup the device, copy the tests, resolve any dependencies, run them, and report the results back to you.

Some disclaimers
Support for running tests this way is still new. If you do find a bug, please file it!

To use the tool first install autopkgtest. If you are running trusty, the version in the archive is old. For now download the utopic deb file and install it manually. A proper backport still needs to be done.

Also as of this writing, I must caution you that you may run into this bug. If the application fails to download dependencies (you see 404 errors during setup), update your device to the latest image and try again. Note, the latest devel image might be too old if a new image hasn't been promoted in a long time.

I want to see it!
Go ahead, give it a whirl with the calendar application (or your favorite core app). Plug in a device, then run the following on your pc.

bzr branch lp:ubuntu-calendar-app
adt-run ubuntu-calendar-app --click=com.ubuntu.calendar --- ssh -s /usr/share/autopkgtest/ssh-setup/adb

Autopkgtest will give you some output along the way about what is happening. The tests will be copied, and since --click= was specified, the runner will use the click from the device, install the click in our temporary environment, and read the click manifest file for dependencies and install those too. Finally, the tests will be executed with the results returned to you.

Feedback please!
Please try running your autopilot testsuites this way and give feedback! Feel free to contact myself, the upstream authors (thanks Martin Pitt for adding support for this!), or simply file a bug. If you run into trouble, utilize the -d and the --shell switches to get more insight into what is happening while running.

Monday, July 14, 2014

Utopic Test Writing Hackfest

We're having our first hackfest of the utopic cycle this week on Tuesday, July 15th. You can catch us live in a hangout on ubuntuonair.com starting at 1900 UTC. Everything you need to know can be found on the wiki page for the event.

During the hangout, we'll be demonstrating writing a new manual testcase, as well as reviewing writing automated testcases. We'll be answering any questions you have as well about contributing a testcase.

We need your help to write some new testcases! We're targeting both manual and automated testcase, so everyone is welcome to pitch in.

We are looking at writing and finishing some testcases for ubuntu studio and some other flavors. All you need is some basic tester knowledge and the ability to write in English.

If you know python, we are also going to be hacking on the toolkit helper for autopilot for the ubuntu sdk. That's a mouthful! Specifically it's the helpers that we use for writing autopilot tests against ubuntu-sdk applications. All app developers make use of these helpers, and we need more of them to ensure we have good coverage for all components developers use. 

Don't worry about getting stuck, we'll be around to help, and there's guides to well, guide you!

Hope to see everyone there!

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Utopic Bug Hug and Testing Day

The first testing day of the utopic cycle is coming this week on Thursday, July 10th. You can catch us live in a hangout on ubuntuonair.com starting at 1900 UTC. We'll be demonstrating running and testing the development release of ubuntu, reporting test results, reporting bugs, and doing triage work. We'll also be availible to answer your questions and help you get started testing as well.

Please join us in testing utopic and helping the next release of ubuntu become the best it can be. Hope to see everyone there!

P.S. We have a team calendar that can help you keep track of the release schedule along with this and other events. Check it out!

Monday, June 2, 2014

Calling for your UOS users session!

Ubuntu Online Summit is approaching, happening on June 10th-12th.This time it's a bit different from how vUDS has been in the past. Rather than the narrower developer focus, this intends to be a full blown community summit. If you've attending things like ubuntu open week or a classroom session in the past, all of those types of sessions are welcome and encouraged too.

To help foster these types of sessions, there is a special Users track.

"The focus of the Users track is to highlight ways to get the most out of Ubuntu, on your laptop, your phone or your server. From detailed how-to sessions, to tips and tricks, and more, this track can provide something for everybody, regardless of skill level."

Track Leads:
Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph
Nicholas Skaggs
Valorie Zimmerman

I'm excitied to be a track lead for this track along with Liz and Val. We are all inviting you to consider scheduling a session to share your knowledge of ubuntu. Share an idea, discuss your passion, give a how-to, etc. The sessions in this track are meant for other users of ubuntu like yourself, so feel free to share.

Regardless of your desire to contribute a session, I would encourage everyone to take a look at the schedule as it evolves and considering joining in sessions they find interesting.
.
Remember, this track is your track and filled with your sessions. Let's help make the online summit a success.

So ready to propose a session? Checkout this page and feel free to ping Val, Liz or myself for help. Don't forget to register to attend and check out the currently scheduled sessions!